♥Margaret Atwood, Tim Minchin, Sherlock Holmes stories, Shakespeare, Star Wars, Dylan Moran, Richard Dawkins, JCS and everything in between♥ There is absolutely no rhyme, reason, or theme to what I post. I try to tag so you can savior my shit but I have been known to forget. Boston raised, Tokyo is my current home. Right now I am compulsively posting "In the Flesh"

"A truth should exist, it should not be used like this. If I love you is that a fact or a weapon?" Margaret Atwood

 

potatoesandplaces:

"when the sun has set, no candle can replace it" | 8tracks

Inspired by The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

"Lit from within - fiercely sexual, blindingly beautiful…

                                                                        …who could ever resist him?

bonjourentrez:

sgtangua:

tomorrowsofyesterday:

So @TheCapitolPN tweeted this
image

which was promptly deleted. (G-Bb-A-D are the notes to Rue’s whistle.)

But if you had clicked inspect element before it was deleted

image

"You silence our voices, but we are still heard."

HOW COOL IS THIS MARKETING?!?! Like the rebels are hacking into the capitol’s twitter!!!!

(Thanks toastbabeis and mockingjaysource for noticing it and jenliamjosh for reblogging)

I love it when marketing folks do the smart.

this is amazing, wow. 

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme
[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme

[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

And Lot’s wife, of course, was told not to look back where all those people and their homes had been. But she did look back, and I love her for that, because it was so human. So she was turned into a pillar of salt. So it goes.

Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (via likeafieldmouse)

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

septemberwildflowers:

art meme: 3/? colors: rose

Frederic Leighton - Elijah in the Wilderness; Alphonse Mucha - Rose; John Singer-Sargent - Mrs Carl Meyer and her ChildrenFrançois-Hubert Drouais - Portrait de Femme; François-Hubert Drouais - Madame du BarryAnton Raphael Mengs - Maria Luisa of Parma; Edgar Degas - The Pink Dancer; Edward Robert Hughes - Juliette Gordon Low; Gustave Jean Jaquet - Portrait of a Lady